Cabot's Pueblo Museum

Cabot’s Pueblo Museum is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places! Cabot Yerxa started building his Museum and home in about 1941 at the age of 57, although collecting the materials he needed to build the Pueblo started years before.

The Hopi-inspired structure is hand-made, created from reclaimed and found materials Cabot was inspired as a young boy when he first saw a replica of a Southwest Indian pueblo at the Chicago World’s Fair. Much of the material used to build the Pueblo was from abandoned cabins that had housed the men who built the California aqueduct in the 1930’s. Cabot purchased these cabins and deconstructed them to build his Pueblo. The Pueblo is four-stories, 5,000 square feet and includes 35 rooms, 150 windows and 65 doors. Much of the Pueblo is made from adobe-style and sun-dried brick Cabot made himself in the courtyard. Cabot modified his formula and used a cup of cement rather than straw to make his bricks.

Take a tour of the interior of this Pueblo and marvel at its construction.

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Palm Springs Aerial Tramway

The Palm Springs Aerial Tramway constructed in the rugged Chino Canyon on the north edge of Palm Springs did not just happen. It required foresight, planning, financing and most of all vision.

As a young electrical engineer, Francis Crocker’s dream began in 1935 while he was on a trip to Banning, California, with newspaper publisher Carl Barkow. Mopping his brow in the heat of the day, Crocker gazed on longingly at the still snow-capped peak of Mount San Jacinto, 10,834 feet high and longed to “go up there where it’s nice and cool” At that moment, “Crocker’s Folly,” as it was soon dubbed by one newspaper woman, was born – a tramway up the sheer cliffs of Chino Canyon.

Construction of the Tramway was an engineering challenge and was soon labeled the “eighth wonder of the world.” The superlative was earned because of the ingenious use of helicopters in erecting four of the five supporting towers. Twenty-years later, the Tramway was designated an historical civil engineering landmark.

In 1998 the Tramway announced that it was embarking on an ambitious modernization program that would see the construction and installation in 2000 of new cars and updating of its facilities. Beginning in September 2000, passengers rode the world’s largest rotating tramcars constructed.

Since 1963 nearly 18 million people have traveled the 10-minute, 2.5-mile ride, which begins at the Valley Station – elevation 2,643 feet and ends at the Mountain Station – elevation 8,516 feet.

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The Living Desert

The Living Desert’s mission is desert conservation through preservation, education and appreciation.

For almost four decades The Living Desert has been engaged in the important work of preserving, conserving and interpreting the desert and all its varied plant and animal life. Even as we take immense pride in our accomplishments over the last forty years, we remain as dedicated as ever to the goals that initially inspired us when we first began operations in March of 1970.

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Joshua Tree National Park

Two distinct desert ecosystems, the Mojave and the Colorado, come together in Joshua Tree National Park. A fascinating variety of plants and animals make their homes in a land sculpted by strong winds and occasional torrents of rain. Dark night skies, a rich cultural history, and surreal geologic features add to the wonder of this vast wilderness in southern California. Come explore for yourself.

Joshua Tree National Park is immense, nearly 800,000 acres, and infinitely variable. It can seem unwelcoming, even brutal during the heat of summer when, in fact, it is delicate and extremely fragile. This is a land shaped by strong winds, sudden torrents of rain, and climatic extremes. Rainfall is sparse and unpredictable. Streambeds are usually dry and waterholes are few. Viewed in summer, this land may appear defeated and dead, but within this parched environment are intricate living systems waiting for the opportune moment to reproduce. The individuals, both plant and animal, that inhabit the park are not individualists. They depend on their entire ecosystem for survival.

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Tahquitz Canyon

The Tahquitz Canyon Trail is a two mile loop trail which leads to Tahquitz Falls and back. From the Visitor Center to the falls you will be gaining 350 feet in elevation.

The Legend of Tahquitz says that Tahquitz was the first shaman created by Mukat, the creator of all things. Tahquitz had much power, and in the beginning he used his power for the good of all people. Tahquitz became the guardian spirit of all shamans and he gave them power to do good. But over time, Tahquitz began to use his power for selfish reasons. He began to use his power to harm the Cahuilla People. The people became angry and they banished Tahquitz to this canyon that now bears his name. He made his home high in the San Jacinto Mountains in a secret cave below the towering rock known today as Tahquitz Peak. It is said that his spirit still lives in this canyon. He can sometimes be seen as a large green fireball streaking across the night sky. The strange rumblings heard deep within the San Jacinto Mountains, the shaking of the ground, and the crashing of boulders are all attributed to Tahquitz as he stomps about the canyon.

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Whitewater Preserve

Whitewater Preserve is 2,851 acres surrounded by the Bureau of Land Management’s San Gorgonio Wilderness, and includes the year-round Whitewater River. Rich riparian habitat hosts the endangered Southwest willow flycatcher and Bell’s vireo, and provides opportunity to see migrating summer tanagers and vermilion flycatchers. The canyon has a robust population of bighorn sheep, deer and bear, and is an important wildlife corridor between the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Mountains. The Conservancy purchased an additional 3,200 acres in the Whitewater corridor that was donated to the Bureau of Land Management. These donated lands include sand dunes that are home to the endangered fringe-toed lizard at Windy Point, which lies at the confluence of the Whitewater and San Gorgonio Rivers.

Whitewater features a trout farm, which only costs $5 to go finishing.

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Mission Creek Preserve

Located in a transition zone between the Sonoran and Mojave deserts, the 4760 acre Mission Creek Preserve has a rich species composition, with flora and fauna representing both deserts. Visitors are surprised to discover the center of the preserve is a lush wetlands juxtaposed with extensively eroded painted hills and Mount San Gorgonio looming in the background. The wetlands and perennial stream are important habitat the endangered least Bell's vireo and southwestern willow flycatcher. The preserve hosts deer, bear, big horn sheep and mountain lions and has spectacular displays of spring wildflowers in wet years. The preserve trail system leads onto the Pacific Crest Trail which is two miles from the stone house group campground.

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Desert Hot Springs History

It's the Water

It was the water accumulating in natural seeps scattered over a barren desert landscape that attracted Native Americans to camp in the area during the winter months when they left their canyon and mountain homes for the warmth of the desert.

Three main sources over five miles apart provided the water needs for these early people. Willow Hole to the east and Seven Palms and Two Bunch Palms to the west provided water from seeps in the sand. Willow Hole was used by wildlife and Native Americans for countless years.

Today, it is still the water that attracts residents and visitors to Desert Hot Springs. Very few other places in the world can boast of naturally occurring hot and cold mineral water of the purest and most beneficial quality.

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California's Greatest Vortex - in Desert Hot Springs

Energy vortex, what the heck is that? I knew you'd ask me that, so here it goes. In the case of an Earth energy vortex, it is a location where several Earth powers converge. Vortexes are power spots where a great concentration of energy emits from the planet. Some experts feel that these power points are themselves only surface manifestations of an energy infrastructure within the planet. There are two types of energy vortexes. Positive vortexes expand and perpetuate energy. Negative vortexes dissipate energy. I'll have more to say about negative vortexes later.

In the extraordinary case of Desert Hot Springs, there is a convergence of five energies. Earthquake faults, geothermal underground water, mountain peak alignments, wind, and Sun energies. The map included here (you can click on it to see a larger version) will help you understand the location of these energies and their relationship to one another. First, the green line running from bottom right to top left (from Southeast to Northwest) is the Mission Creek fault line. This fault is a break off from the famous San Andreas Fault, which is South of the city. The blue circled area is the location of the underground hot water lake. The blue dashed line running through the lake is the mathematical mean of the lake's position. The red line with the circles is the line connecting the peaks of the rim of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. These mountains border the city to the Northeast. Notice that these three lines are almost parallel to one another. This means that their energy fields are in alignment with one another. This is no accident, for the underground lake is held in place by the fault line and the mountains provide the water runoff for the lake. This is another example of nature in harmony.

Did you know Desert Hot Springs is home to California's greatest Vortex? It has every element - from the water, sun, faultline and wind. Roger Sunpath wrote a great article about Desert Hot Springs and its energy vortex: Energy vortex, what the heck is that? I knew you'd ask me that, so here it goes. In the case of an Earth energy vortex, it is a location where several Earth powers converge. Vortexes are power spots where a great concentration of energy emits from the planet. Some experts feel that these power points are themselves only surface manifestations of an energy infrastructure within the planet. There are two types of energy vortexes. Positive vortexes expand and perpetuate energy. Negative vortexes dissipate energy. I'll have more to say about negative vortexes later. vortex in DHS In the extraordinary case of Desert Hot Springs, there is a convergence of five energies. Earthquake faults, geothermal underground water, mountain peak alignments, wind, and Sun energies. The map included here (you can click on it to see a larger version) will help you understand the location of these energies and their relationship to one another. First, the green line running from bottom right to top left (from Southeast to Northwest) is the Mission Creek fault line. This fault is a break off from the famous San Andreas Fault, which is South of the city. The blue circled area is the location of the underground hot water lake. The blue dashed line running through the lake is the mathematical mean of the lake's position. The red line with the circles is the line connecting the peaks of the rim of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. These mountains border the city to the Northeast. Notice that these three lines are almost parallel to one another. This means that their energy fields are in alignment with one another. This is no accident, for the underground lake is held in place by the fault line and the mountains provide the water runoff for the lake. This is another example of nature in harmony. The important thing to know here is if you are standing facing the Northeast you are putting your body in alignment with these positive energies. You may have even found yourself standing in this direction and rested or meditating and not really knowing why. Maybe you just found it comfortable. It's like sitting in front of your fireplace at home. We all like to sit directly in front, not off to the side, so we can feel the warmth and see the dancing images in the flames. It is unfortunate that the founding fathers of the city were unaware of this energy alignment. If they had constructed the city streets on a Northwest by Southeast axis, the general population would be calmer. In addition to these energies we have strong wind energy, from the common therapeutic breeze to the sometimes ferocious storms. The wind is an energy of purification. Could you imagine the trouble we would be in if our wind didn't blow and ground the smog that enters our valley from the West? Many of us Native Americans can listen to the wind and hear it talk. It sometimes tells us about the conditions from where it came; sometimes it will tell us about the weather that is coming. Finally there is the wonderful Sun energy for which this area is famous. As the Sun transits from the East to the West, it bathes the valley with all its power, brightness, and healing energy. Read the full article at EnergyVortex.net.

Learn more from Roger Sunpath's original article.

Is Desert Hot Springs an Energy Vortex?

Did you know Desert Hot Springs is home to California's greatest Vortex?  It has every element - from the water, sun, faultline and wind.

Roger Sunpath wrote a great article about Desert Hot Springs and its energy vortex:

Energy vortex, what the heck is that? I knew you'd ask me that, so here it goes. In the case of an Earth energy vortex, it is a location where several Earth powers converge. Vortexes are power spots where a great concentration of energy emits from the planet. Some experts feel that these power points are themselves only surface manifestations of an energy infrastructure within the planet. There are two types of energy vortexes. Positive vortexes expand and perpetuate energy. Negative vortexes dissipate energy. I'll have more to say about negative vortexes later.

vortex in DHS In the extraordinary case of Desert Hot Springs, there is a convergence of five energies. Earthquake faults, geothermal underground water, mountain peak alignments, wind, and Sun energies. The map included here (you can click on it to see a larger version) will help you understand the location of these energies and their relationship to one another. First, the green line running from bottom right to top left (from Southeast to Northwest) is the Mission Creek fault line. This fault is a break off from the famous San Andreas Fault, which is South of the city. The blue circled area is the location of the underground hot water lake. The blue dashed line running through the lake is the mathematical mean of the lake's position. The red line with the circles is the line connecting the peaks of the rim of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. These mountains border the city to the Northeast. Notice that these three lines are almost parallel to one another. This means that their energy fields are in alignment with one another. This is no accident, for the underground lake is held in place by the fault line and the mountains provide the water runoff for the lake. This is another example of nature in harmony.

The important thing to know here is if you are standing facing the Northeast you are putting your body in alignment with these positive energies. You may have even found yourself standing in this direction and rested or meditating and not really knowing why. Maybe you just found it comfortable. It's like sitting in front of your fireplace at home. We all like to sit directly in front, not off to the side, so we can feel the warmth and see the dancing images in the flames.

It is unfortunate that the founding fathers of the city were unaware of this energy alignment. If they had constructed the city streets on a Northwest by Southeast axis, the general population would be calmer.

In addition to these energies we have strong wind energy, from the common therapeutic breeze to the sometimes ferocious storms. The wind is an energy of purification. Could you imagine the trouble we would be in if our wind didn't blow and ground the smog that enters our valley from the West? Many of us Native Americans can listen to the wind and hear it talk. It sometimes tells us about the conditions from where it came; sometimes it will tell us about the weather that is coming.

Finally, there is the wonderful Sun energy for which this area is famous. As the Sun transits from the East to the West, it bathes the valley with all its power, brightness, and healing energy.

Read the full article at EnergyVortex.net.

   
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